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Black and White Fire Agate?


Vargtid
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I have, in taking up jewelry crafting, taken up learning about different stones' properties; Fire Agate being one of them.  I recently found strands of beads of pure black/blue and white beads of Fire Agate.  This stone is known to be most every color of the rainbow (most often many at once), but I can't find anything, or at least haven't yet about black and white on the internet.  Some of the beads are so blue and white that they resemble something like Sodalite.  There is no red, green, or yellow in them as I expect to see in Fire Agate - these are strictly monochrome cold colors.

I see within it more of an aspect of stoicism.  Please, and this is the topic of this, chime in and correct me.  I've never seen black/blue and white Fire Agate until these beads.  Of the many things I seek to understand, the real meanings of stones are among them.  Minerals are older than... well... yeah, and so deserve understanding.  Does anyone here know anything of this?  And when I say "black and white", I mean it.  It's fascinating.

Thank you,

-Varg

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I shall elaborate.  Minerals are of great interest to me.  Even a stone shaped last year that you buy from your local shop took millions of years prior to form.  Stones and crystals, I assume, are of interest to any Shaman.  One of my most recent fascinations is CZ (Cubic Zirconia).  I don't know off-hand much of its history, but know of its properties.  Most people think they're just 'fake diamonds', but they're much more than that.  They actually out-perform diamonds in many aspects, save for rarity, hence the lower cost; this is because we can grow them in a controlled environment.  They can be any color, or every color, they have a higher reflective index (or whatever the scientific term is), and are almost as hard (as in a 9/10 on the hardness scale, as opposed to a diamond's 10/10).  They do not fund bloodshed, war, monopolies, or politics in any nation and can be of any color of the rainbow.  I've always been a CZ guy and given the opportunity will always choose the CZ route.

Diamonds and Cubic Zirconia alike are both organically grown crystals, just under different circumstances.  But then are there not indrustrially created diamonds in some of my saw blades?  There are.  As so too there are in some of my electronics.  I don't cut or shape stones or crystals; I merely use them.  I do work with leather and bone, however.  These have 'memory'.  So too do minerals and crystals - all alike.  Keep this in mind ;)

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I  really don't know much about specific types of stones and their qualities. Makers tend to look for generic rocks from the place they live or where they are working. When I am looking for a rock to work with, I search for one that I connect with first and then after I've decided to work with it, then I try to find out what kind it is. That being said, we makers do appreciate the different qualities of different types of rocks, I just don't know a lot about different stones personally. I love working with granite and basalt because they have been common where I live and I've had good experiences working with them. 
 

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silenceseeker,

I have done the same exact thing.  Allow me an example:  Once, many years ago, I was looking for a nice, roundish stone to use as a center stone on an altar.  I searched the riverbed for literally hours, and found nothing.  Because it wasn't there.  Over the last twenty or so years I have found many stones of unique quality, and I don't mean the ones the books say, but I mean the ones that speak to you.  

I have a huge collection of stones, but to this day, that many years later, still have not found that one, flat round stone.  One day I will find it.

That said, however, I was inquiring as to the OP of Black/White Fire Agate because I can't find anything on it, but yes, I perfectly understand your reply.  Thank you.

-Varg.

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P.S.

When I was staying on the Pacific Coast a couple of months ago, I did find a nice flat round stone washed ashore on the beach with a hole in it and a second, smaller stone wedged within that hole, which although unique, was still, no, not what I was looking for.  I will know when I find it, so yes, I know what you mean.

-Varg

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